Please join us for the 2020 Wisconsin Pest Management Update Virtual Meetings! 

 

Registration Link: https://go.wisc.edu/78t2bd  

The format for the Wisconsin Pest Management Update will be different this year because of COVID-19. Presentations will include pest management information for Wisconsin field and forage crops. Speakers will include Mark Renz, Nick Arneson, and Rodrigo Werle, Weed Scientists, Damon Smith, Plant Pathologist, and Bryan Jensen, Entomologist. Virtual meetings with the same content will be offered multiple times the week of November 9 and will run for 2 hours each. The dates and times are listed below, please choose the option that best fits your schedule. There are also 2 CCA CEUs in the area of Pest Management available for this meeting.

Register by November 2, 2020. Register here:  https://go.wisc.edu/78t2bd  

Thanks to Kimberly Schmidt, Shawano County Agriculture Educator, Dan Marzu, Lincoln and Langlade Counties Agriculture Educator, and Mimi Broeske, Nutrient and Pest Management Editor, for their assistance with registration and promotion of our event.

This program is sponsored by the University of Wisconsin-Madison Division of Extension and University of Wisconsin-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. An EEO/AA employer, University of Wisconsin-Madison Division of Extension provides equal opportunities in employment and programming, including Title VI, Title IX, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act requirements.

Crop Protection Network (CPN) Needs Your Input!

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Help the CPN determine how to serve you best through this short survey.

The Crop Protection Network (CPN) develops tools to help farmers, ag industry, and researchers with crop protection decisions. The CPN is a partnership of university Extension specialists providing unbiased, research-based information at no cost.

The CPN is conducting a survey to help determine how to best serve agricultural clientele now and in the future. You can help by taking a short survey at: https://iastate.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_1FUAhZZ9YZmDva5

Since 2015, the CPN has developed free extension tools including publications, foliar fungicide efficacy guides, annual disease loss estimates, training for field scouts, and a tool for Certified Crop Adviser’s (CCAs) to earn continuing education units. See cropprotectionnetwork.org to access these resources.

 

 

 

Wisconsin Soybean White Mold Update – July 29, 2020

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Shawn Conley, Extension Soybean and Small Grains Agronomist, Department of Agronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Roger Schmidt, Nutrient and Pest Management Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Figure 1. Sporecaster predictions for selected non-irrigated locations in Wisconsin for July 29, 2020.

Figure 1 illustrates the calculated risk of white mold for select Wisconsin locations for non-irrigated soybeans, as determined by Sporecaster for July 29, 2020. This means that if soybeans are flowering and the area between rows is filled in more than 50%, risk is just moderate in most locations of the state, with the exception of the far northeast portions of the state and Door County. This moderate risk indicates that there may not be apothecia present in fields in these locations at this time, with reduced risk of subsequent white mold development due to hot and dry conditions. Remember that this season, you have the ability to change the action threshold for each field in the app. Last season the action threshold was locked at 40%, which is still a reasonable threshold for Wisconsin. Thus, figure 1 risk is calculated based on 40%. You can tailor this threshold to your liking based on your prior knowledge of a field, or your acceptable risk level. Further tailored predictions for irrigated locations and locations planted to narrower row-spacing can be run by downloading the Sporecaster app to your smartphone.

As we move toward the end of the fungicide spray window at R3, a fungicide application might not be warranted at this time on non-irrigated fields. In irrigated fields, we are seeing higher risk and finding apothecia in irrigated fields in central locations. A fungicide spray might be warranted in this situation.

I’m Ready To Spray, What Should I use?

If the canopy has met threshold, soybeans are flowering, and your Sporecaster risk is high, then a fungicide might be warranted. If you have decided to spray soybeans for white mold, what are the best products to use? I have written extensively about this in a previous post which you can find HERE. Over the last several years we have run numerous fungicide efficacy trials in Wisconsin and in conjunction with researchers in other states. In Wisconsin, we have observed that Endura applied at 8 oz once between the R1 and R3 growth stages performs well. We have also observed that the fungicide Aproach applied at 9 fl oz at R1 and again at R3 also performs comparably to the Endura treatment. Other fungicide options also include Omega and Proline. You can view results of past fungicide evaluations for Wisconsin by CLICKING HERE. If you would like to run tailored estimations of return on investment for various fungicide programs, you can use another smartphone application called Sporebuster.

Helpful Smartphone Application Links

Sporecaster

  1. Click here to download the Android version of Sporecaster. 
  2. Click here to download the iPhone version of Sporecaster.
  3. Here is a helpful video if you would like some tips on how to use Sporecaster.

Sporebuster

  1. Click here to download the Android version of Sporebuster.
  2. Click here to download the iPhone version of Sporebuster.
  3. Here is a video on how to use Sporebuster and interpret the output.

Other White Mold Resources

  1. To watch an in-depth video on white mold management, CLICK HERE.
  2. To find more information and download a fact sheet on white mold from the Crop Protection Network, CLICK HERE.

Wisconsin Corn Tar Spot Update – July 29, 2020

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Roger Schmidt, Nutrient and Pest Management Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison

No new county level first-detects of tar spot in Wisconsin have been added to the national tar spot map this week (Fig. 1). This week we are seeing just a a handful of new counties added in the Midwest corn belt. Note that all county level confirmations for 2020 are in areas where the disease has been previously reported.

Figure 1. Corn IpmPIPE tar spot confirmations for U.S. Counties as of July 29, 2020. Grey shading indicates past confirmation in the county. Orange shading indicates a positive confirmation for 2020. Yellow shading indicates a probable positive.

Figure 2. Tar Spot risk for various locations in Wisconsin for July 29, 2020.

Figure 2 shows the calculated risk from Tarspotter (our smartphone prediction tool for tar spot) for July 29, 2020, for various locations in Wisconsin. The action threshold for high risk is 75% using the updated Tarspotter model for 2020. As you can see, the present risk has continued to decline overall for the entire state with the exception of the far Northwest, where there is not a history of tar spot. Continued dryer and warm weather is less conducive for the development of tar spot, thus we see the risk continuing to decline. So while we can find tar spot in handful of fields, progress of the disease is slow. Remember, tar spot is favored by persistent temperatures between 60 and 70 F and high relative humidity averaging above 75% for a 30-day period, accompanied by extended periods of leaf wetness caused by dew, rain, or irrigation events. The newest Tarspotter tool captures all of these aspects and balances these in the calculations of risk in the map above.

The Recommendation

Tassels and silks have been out in the southern portion of the state. We are now in the tail-end of the window of opportunity for a fungicide application if you feel the risk for disease, including tar spot, is warranted. While tar spot is slow to develop, we have seen gray leaf spot (GLS) developing in the lower canopy and moving up. We continue to also scout for southern rust, but have had no confirmations of this disease so far in Wisconsin.

Do some scouting and check weather reports. If it is dry in your area and has been hot, then no disease may be present. You might be able to hold off on that fungicide application. If it has been humid and rainy and you have some disease present in the lower canopy, then a fungicide application might be warranted. Now is the critical time to pay attention to disease development and make a final fungicide spray decision. See my previous post for more information about making the decision to spray fungicide on corn.

More Tar Spot Information

  1. Tar Spot Fact sheet (Updated for 2020!)
  2. Short Tar Spot Video
  3. Tar Spot Webinar 
  4. Corn Fungicide Efficacy Table

Wisconsin Soybean White Mold Update – July 23, 2020

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Shawn Conley, Extension Soybean and Small Grains Agronomist, Department of Agronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Roger Schmidt, Nutrient and Pest Management Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Figure 1. Sporecaster predictions for selected non-irrigated locations in Wisconsin for July 23, 2020.

Figure 1 illustrates the calculated risk of white mold for select Wisconsin locations for non-irrigated soybeans, as determined by Sporecaster for July 23, 2020. This means that if soybeans are flowering and the area between rows is filled in more than 50%, risk is just moderate in most locations of the state, with the exception of the far northern portions of the state and Door County. This moderate risk indicates that there may not be apothecia present in fields in these locations at this time, with reduced risk of subsequent white mold development due to hot and dry conditions. Remember that this season, you have the ability to change the action threshold for each field in the app. Last season the action threshold was locked at 40%, which is still a reasonable threshold for Wisconsin. Thus, figure 1 risk is calculated based on 40%. You can tailor this threshold to your liking based on your prior knowledge of a field, or your acceptable risk level. Further tailored predictions for irrigated locations and locations planted to narrower row-spacing can be run by downloading the Sporecaster app to your smartphone.

We are finding risk to be higher for irrigated locations. As expected, we found apothecia (Fig. 2) present in our irrigated research location on the Hancock Agricultural Research Station located in Hancock, Wisconsin. Irrigated environments are often highly conducive for white mold development.

I’m Ready To Spray, What Should I use?

Figure 2. An apothecium of the white mold fungus. The dime is included for size comparison.

If the canopy has met threshold, soybeans are flowering, and your Sporecaster risk is high, then a fungicide might be warranted. If you have decided to spray soybeans for white mold, what are the best products to use? I have written extensively about this in a previous post which you can find HERE. Over the last several years we have run numerous fungicide efficacy trials in Wisconsin and in conjunction with researchers in other states. In Wisconsin, we have observed that Endura applied at 8 oz once between the R1 and R3 growth stages performs well. We have also observed that the fungicide Aproach applied at 9 fl oz at R1 and again at R3 also performs comparably to the Endura treatment. Other fungicide options also include Omega and Proline. You can view results of past fungicide evaluations for Wisconsin by CLICKING HERE. If you would like to run tailored estimations of return on investment for various fungicide programs, you can use another smartphone application called Sporebuster.

Helpful Smartphone Application Links

Sporecaster

  1. Click here to download the Android version of Sporecaster. 
  2. Click here to download the iPhone version of Sporecaster.
  3. Here is a helpful video if you would like some tips on how to use Sporecaster.

Sporebuster

  1. Click here to download the Android version of Sporebuster.
  2. Click here to download the iPhone version of Sporebuster.
  3. Here is a video on how to use Sporebuster and interpret the output.

Other White Mold Resources

  1. To watch an in-depth video on white mold management, CLICK HERE.
  2. To find more information and download a fact sheet on white mold from the Crop Protection Network, CLICK HERE.

Wisconsin Corn Tar Spot Update – July 23, 2020

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Roger Schmidt, Nutrient and Pest Management Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison

No new county level first-detects of tar spot in Wisconsin have been added to the national tar spot map this week (Fig. 1). This week we are seeing more counties being added now in Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Michigan. Note that all county level confirmations for 2020 are in areas where the disease has been previously reported.

 

Figure 1. Corn IpmPIPE tar spot confirmations for U.S. Counties as of July 23, 2020. Grey shading indicates past confirmation in the county. Orange shading indicates a positive confirmation for 2020.

 

Figure 2. Tar Spot risk for various locations in Wisconsin for July 23, 2020.

Figure 2 shows the calculated risk from Tarspotter (our smartphone prediction tool for tar spot) for July 23, 2020, for various locations in Wisconsin. The action threshold for high risk is 75% using the updated Tarspotter model for 2020. As you can see, the present risk has declined overall for most of the state with exceptions for south-central and far Northwest Wisconsin. Dryer and warmer weather is less conducive for the development of tar spot, thus we see the risk slowly declining. Remember, tar spot is favored by persistent temperatures between 60 and 70 F and high relative humidity averaging above 75% for a 30-day period, accompanied by extended periods of leaf wetness caused by dew, rain, or irrigation events. The newest Tarspotter tool captures all of these aspects and balances these in the calculations of risk in the map above.

The Recommendation

Tassels and silks are out in the southern portion of the state. We are now in the window of opportunity for a fungicide application if you feel the risk for disease, including tar spot, is warranted. While tar spot is slow to develop, we have seen gray leaf spot (GLS) developing in the lower canopy and moving up. Do some scouting and check weather reports. If it is dry in your area and has been hot, then no disease may be present. You might be able to hold off on that fungicide application. If it has been humid and rainy and you have some disease present in the lower canopy, then a fungicide application might be warranted. Now is the critical time to pay attention to disease development and make a fungicide spray decision. See my previous post for more information about making the decision to spray fungicide on corn.

More Tar Spot Information

  1. Tar Spot Fact sheet (Updated for 2020!)
  2. Short Tar Spot Video
  3. Tar Spot Webinar 
  4. Corn Fungicide Efficacy Table

Wisconsin Corn Tar Spot Update – July 14, 2020

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Roger Schmidt, Nutrient and Pest Management Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Last week brought our first detect of tar spot in Wisconsin for the 2020 field season. This week we are seeing more counties being added now in Iowa and Indiana, with some additional non-confirmed reports from southwest Wisconsin. Figure 1, show the location of the confirmed detections, which are all in the previously recorded range of the tar spot pathogen.

Figure 1. Corn IpmPIPE tar spot confirmations for U.S. Counties as of July 14, 2020. Grey shading indicates past confirmation in the county. Orange shading indicates a positive confirmation for 2020.

Figure 2. Tar Spot risk for various locations in Wisconsin for July 14, 2020.

Figure 2 shows the calculated risk from Tarspotter (our smartphone prediction tool for tar spot) for July 14, 2020, for various locations in Wisconsin. Figure 3 shows the risk for locations in southern and south-central Wisconsin. The action threshold for high risk is 75% using the updated Tarspotter model for 2020. As you can see, the present risk is elevated in much of the southern and southwestern portion of the state, the areas where reports are coming in. This is due to the fact that the weather continues to be relatively wet and humid for the past 30 days with decent rainfall. Cooler conditions this week are also contributing to the rising risk. Tar spot is favored by persistent temperatures between 60 and 70 F and high relative humidity averaging above 75% for a 30-day period, accompanied by extended periods of leaf wetness caused by dew, rain, or irrigation events. The newest Tarspotter tool captures all of these aspects and balances these in the calculations of risk in the map above.

The Recommendation

Figure 3. Tar spot risk for the southern and south-central zones of Wisconsin for July 14, 2020.

Tassels are starting to peek or are out in the southern portion of the state. We are now in the window of opportunity for a fungicide application if you feel the risk for disease, including tar spot, is warranted. Do some scouting and check weather reports. If it is dry in your area and has been hot, then no disease may be present. You might be able to hold off on that fungicide application. If it has been humid and rainy and you have some disease present in the lower canopy, then a fungicide application might be warranted. See my previous post for more information about making the decision to spray fungicide on corn.

More Tar Spot Information

  1. Tar Spot Fact sheet (Updated for 2020!)
  2. Short Tar Spot Video
  3. Tar Spot Webinar 
  4. Corn Fungicide Efficacy Table

Wisconsin Soybean White Mold Update – July 14, 2020

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Shawn Conley, Extension Soybean and Small Grains Agronomist, Department of Agronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Roger Schmidt, Nutrient and Pest Management Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Figure 1. Sporecaster predictions for selected non-irrigated locations in Wisconsin for July 14, 2020.

Figure 1 illustrates the calculated risk of white mold for select Wisconsin locations for non-irrigated soybeans, as determined by Sporecaster for July 14, 2020. This means that if soybeans are flowering and the area between rows is filled in more than 50%, risk ranges from medium in the southern and western regions of the state to high in the central and northeastern regions for the presence of apothecia and subsequent white mold development. Remember, canopy closure is critical in calculating the probability of apothecial presence and subsequent white mold risk. DON’T CHEAT when using Sporecaster at your own locations! Also remember that this season, you have the ability to change the action threshold for each field. Last season the action threshold was locked at 40%, which is still a reasonable threshold for Wisconsin. Thus, figure 1 risk is calculated based on 40%. You can tailor this threshold to your liking based on your prior knowledge of a field, or your acceptable risk level. Further tailored predictions for irrigated locations and locations planted to narrower row-spacing can be run by downloading the Sporecaster app to your smartphone.

I’m Ready To Spray, What Should I use?

If the canopy has met threshold, soybeans are flowering, and your Sporecaster risk is high, then a fungicide might be warranted. If you have decided to spray soybeans for white mold, what are the best products to use? I have written extensively about this in a previous post which you can find HERE. Over the last several years we have run numerous fungicide efficacy trials in Wisconsin and in conjunction with researchers in other states. In Wisconsin, we have observed that Endura applied at 8 oz once between the R1 and R3 growth stages performs well. We have also observed that the fungicide Aproach applied at 9 fl oz at R1 and again at R3 also performs comparably to the Endura treatment. Other fungicide options also include Omega and Proline. You can view results of past fungicide evaluations for Wisconsin by CLICKING HERE. If you would like to run tailored estimations of return on investment for various fungicide programs, you can use another smartphone application called Sporebuster.

Helpful Smartphone Application Links

Sporecaster

  1. Click here to download the Android version of Sporecaster. 
  2. Click here to download the iPhone version of Sporecaster.
  3. Here is a helpful video if you would like some tips on how to use Sporecaster.

Sporebuster

  1. Click here to download the Android version of Sporebuster.
  2. Click here to download the iPhone version of Sporebuster.
  3. Here is a video on how to use Sporebuster and interpret the output.

Other White Mold Resources

  1. To watch an in-depth video on white mold management, CLICK HERE.
  2. To find more information and download a fact sheet on white mold from the Crop Protection Network, CLICK HERE.

Wisconsin Soybean White Mold Update – July 9, 2020

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Shawn Conley, Extension Soybean and Small Grains Agronomist, Department of Agronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Roger Schmidt, Nutrient and Pest Management Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Figure 1. Sporecaster predictions for selected non-irrigated locations in Wisconsin for July 9, 2020.

Figure 1 illustrates the calculated risk of white mold for select Wisconsin locations for non-irrigated soybeans, as determined by Sporecaster for July 9, 2020. This means that if soybeans are flowering and the area between rows is filled in more than 50%, risk ranges from medium to high for the presence of apothecia and subsequent white mold development. Remember, canopy closure is critical in calculating the probability of apothecial presence and subsequent white mold risk. DON’T CHEAT when using Sporecaster at your own locations! Tailored predictions for irrigated locations and locations planted to narrower row-spacing can be run by downloading the Sporecaster app to your smartphone.

I’m Ready To Spray, What Should I use?

If the canopy has met threshold, soybeans are flowering, and your Sporecaster risk is high, then a fungicide might be warranted. If you have decided to spray soybeans for white mold, what are the best products to use? I have written extensively about this in a previous post which you can find HERE. Over the last several years we have run numerous fungicide efficacy trials in Wisconsin and in conjunction with researchers in other states. In Wisconsin, we have observed that Endura applied at 8 oz once between the R1 and R3 growth stages performs well. We have also observed that the fungicide Aproach applied at 9 fl oz at R1 and again at R3 also performs comparably to the Endura treatment. Other fungicide options also include Omega and Proline. You can view results of past fungicide evaluations for Wisconsin by CLICKING HERE. If you would like to run tailored estimations of return on investment for various fungicide programs, you can use another smartphone application called Sporebuster.

Helpful Smartphone Application Links

Sporecaster

  1. Click here to download the Android version of Sporecaster. 
  2. Click here to download the iPhone version of Sporecaster.
  3. Here is a helpful video if you would like some tips on how to use Sporecaster.

Sporebuster

  1. Click here to download the Android version of Sporebuster.
  2. Click here to download the iPhone version of Sporebuster.
  3. Here is a video on how to use Sporebuster and interpret the output.

Other White Mold Resources

  1. To watch an in-depth video on white mold management, CLICK HERE.
  2. To find more information and download a fact sheet on white mold from the Crop Protection Network, CLICK HERE.

Wisconsin Corn Tar Spot Update – July 9, 2020

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Roger Schmidt, Nutrient and Pest Management Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Tar spot has been detected on corn for the first time during the 2020 season, this week in Michigan and Indiana. In both situations these were fields with a history of the disease. Incidence and severity is very low, suggesting that the recent warm, dryer weather may be keeping tar spot in check at these sites. Figure 1, show the location of these detections.

Figure 1. Corn IpmPIPE tar spot confirmations for U.S. Counties as of July 9, 2020. Grey shading indicates past confirmation in the county. Orange shading indicates a positive confirmation for 2020.

Figure 2. Tar Spot risk for various locations in Wisconsin for July 9, 2020.

Figure 2 shows the calculated risk from Tarspotter (our smartphone prediction tool for tar spot) for July 9, 2020, for various locations in Wisconsin. Figure 3 shows the risk for locations in southern and south-central Wisconsin. The action threshold for high risk is 75% using the updated Tarspotter model for 2020. As you can see, the present risk is elevated in much of the southern portion of the state, with areas of high risk in the western half of the state. This is due to the fact that the weather continues to be relatively wet and humid for the past 30 days with decent rainfall across this portion of the state, despite relatively warm temperatures. Tar spot is favored by persistent temperatures between 60 and 70 F and high relative humidity averaging above 75% for a 30-day period, accompanied by extended periods of leaf wetness caused by dew, rain, or irrigation events. The newest Tarspotter tool captures all of these aspects and balances these in the calculations of risk in the map above.

We have been scouting fields in the southern portion of the state where there has been a history of tar spot. We have been unable to find any symptoms of tar spot thus far. Fields generally look disease free, which is common this time of year in Wisconsin.

The Recommendation

Figure 3. Tar spot risk for the southern and south-central zones of Wisconsin for July 9, 2020.

Even if weather turns more favorable for tar spot, evaluate the likelihood that tar spot might develop early in your field. Remember, if you have no history of the disease, then the likelihood of local inoculum being present is low. Saving the fungicide application for later in the season might be a better option. If you have a history and you know you have a susceptible hybrid coupled with a no-till situation, then the risk is higher and you need to evaluate the economics of doing an application of fungicide in early or mid v-stages. Remember, if you do a V6-V8 application of fungicide, conditions could stay conducive later in the season for tar spot. Those early applications will “burn out” by the time the tasseling period rolls around. So if you do (or did) put a fungicide spray on at V6-V8, you might have to come back at VT-R2 with another application to protect plants during the reproductive phase, should favorable conditions for tar spot persist. Keep an eye on the weather and keep scouting!

More Tar Spot Information

  1. Tar Spot Fact sheet (Updated for 2020!)
  2. Short Tar Spot Video
  3. Tar Spot Webinar 
  4. Corn Fungicide Efficacy Table