Entries by damonsmith

New Research Update: Disease Development and Deoxynivalenol Accumulation in Silage Corn

Richard W. Webster, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Maxwell O. Chibuogwu, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Hannah Reed, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Brian Mueller, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Carol L. Groves, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Albert U. Tenuta, Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs; Martin I. Chilvers, Michigan State University; Kiersten A. Wise, University of Kentucky; and Damon Smith, University of Wisconsin-Madison. A new research update has just been published on the […]

2021 Wisconsin Pest Management Update Meetings (In-Person Events Cancelled; Virtual Offering Only)

After much deliberation, we made the difficult decision to pivot the 2021 Wisconsin Pest Management Update Meetings from a hybrid model to all virtual because of continued COVID-19 concerns and low registration numbers. Thus, the in-person events at Darlington (November 16, 2021), Chippewa Falls (November 17, 2021) and Kimberly (November 18, 2021) are now cancelled. We […]

Tar Spot Is Here To Stay…

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison Roger Schmidt, Nutrient and Pest Management Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison …let’s start working on how to manage it in Wisconsin (Some thoughts on how to do this in the “Other Resources” below). While we haven’t had major epidemics every year since 2016, […]

Wisconsin Soybean and Corn Disease Update – August 2, 2021

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison Brian Mueller, Assistant Field Researcher, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison Camila Primieri Nicolli, Post-Doctoral Research Associate, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison It has been a while since I posted a corn and soybean disease update for Wisconsin in […]

Wisconsin Soybean and Corn Disease Update – July 7, 2021

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison Brian Mueller, Assistant Field Researcher, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison Roger Schmidt, Nutrient and Pest Management Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison Soybean White Mold Update Figure 1 illustrates the calculated risk of white mold for select Wisconsin locations for non-irrigated soybeans, […]

Fireworks Fly! Time to Think about White Mold Management in Soybeans in Wisconsin

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison Shawn Conley, Extension Soybean and Small Grains Agronomist, Department of Agronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison Roger Schmidt, Nutrient and Pest Management Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison Paul Mitchell, Extension Economist, Agricultural and Applied Economics, University of Wisconsin-Madison In Wisconsin, the first week of July brings […]

Insights on In-Season Corn Disease Management Decisions For the 2021 Season

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison Corn is approaching the V6-V10 range of growth stages in much of Wisconsin. With this, comes many questions about applying fungicide to control disease and preserve yield. What diseases are out there? What disease(s) should I focus on in-season? When should I […]

Wisconsin Winter Wheat Disease Update – May 28, 2021

Damon L. Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison Winter wheat in Southern and South-central Wisconsin is quickly approaching anthesis. By early next week the window of opportunity to apply fungicide for Fusarium head blight (FHB; scab) will be here. Currently the risk for FHB is variable and ranges from […]

Managing Winter Wheat Diseases in Wisconsin During the 2021 Field Season

Damon L. Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison Up until this week diseases of winter wheat have been basically non-existent. Dry weather leading to a moderate drought in much of the state has meant that the environment has not been favorable for most wheat pathogens of concern for us […]