2021 Wisconsin Fungicide Test and Disease Management Summary Now Available

Brian Mueller, Researcher II, UW-Madison, Plant Pathology

Damon Smith, Associate Professor and Extension Specialist, UW-Madison, Plant Pathology

Mimi Broeske, Distinguished Editor, UW-Madison, Nutrient and Pest Management Program

Each year the Wisconsin Field Crops Pathology Program conducts a wide array of fungicide and disease management tests on alfalfa, corn, soybeans, and wheat. These tests help inform researchers, practitioners, and farmers about the efficacy of certain fungicide products on specific diseases and how to pair them with other disease management strategies. We hope you find this report useful in making decisions for the 2022 field season.

The 2021 Wisconsin Field Crops Fungicide Test and Disease Management Summary is available by clicking here. These tests are by no means an exhaustive evaluation of all products available, but can be used to understand the general performance of a particular fungicide in a particular environment. Keep in mind that the best data to make an informed decision, come from multiple years and environments. To find fungicide performance data from Wisconsin in other years, visit the Wisconsin Fungicide Test Summaries page. You can also consult publication A3646 – Pest Management in Wisconsin Field Crops to find information on products labeled for specific crops and efficacy ratings for particular products. Additional efficacy ratings for some fungicide products for corn foliar fungicidessoybean foliar and seed-applied fungicides, and wheat foliar fungicides can be found on the Crop Protection Network website.

Mention of specific products in these publications are for your convenience and do not represent an endorsement or criticism. Remember that this is by no means a complete test of all products available.  You are responsible for using pesticides according to the manufacturers current label. Some products listed in the reports referenced above may not actually have an approved Wisconsin pesticide label. Be sure to check with your local extension office or agricultural chemical supplier to be sure the product you would like to use has an approved label.  Follow all label instructions when using any pesticide. Remember the label is the law!

2021 Wisconsin Pest Management Update Meetings (In-Person Events Cancelled; Virtual Offering Only)

After much deliberation, we made the difficult decision to pivot the 2021 Wisconsin Pest Management Update Meetings from a hybrid model to all virtual because of continued COVID-19 concerns and low registration numbers. Thus, the in-person events at Darlington (November 16, 2021), Chippewa Falls (November 17, 2021) and Kimberly (November 18, 2021) are now cancelled.

We will maintain the virtual offering on Friday November 19th(9:00 AM to Noon) and are adding a second virtual offering of the same program on Tuesday November 16th (1:00 PM to 4:00 PM) so participants can pick the option that best fits their schedule.

To register for one of the virtual events, please go to the following link: https://go.wisc.edu/8tufvc

This year’s speakers will include:

  • Mark Renz, Perennial Cropping Systems Extension Weed Specialist
  • Rodrigo Werle, Annual Cropping Systems Extension Weed Specialist
  • Nick Arneson, Extension Outreach Specialist, weeds
  • PJ Leisch Extension Entomology Diagnostician
  • Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist

Topics will include updates in the area of weed, pest, and disease management along with a panel discussion and Q&A regarding the pest management challenges related to planting soybeans early.

Three (3) Pest Management CCA CEUs have been requested for this event.

Registration includes PDF of A3646 Pest Management In Wisconsin Fields.

We apologize for any inconvenience this decision may cause.

Pest Management Update Team

Save the Dates and Attend the 2021 Pest Management Update Meetings

For 2021, the UW-Madison, Division of Extension and UW-Madison, Nutrient and Pest Management Program (NPM) will host the Pest Management Update Meetings as a hybrid event with (3) in-person meetings and (1) virtual option. All in-person meetings will be held from 1- 4pm local time at the venue listed for each location below. Check in will begin at 12:30pm with light refreshments available during the event. 

This year’s speakers include: Mark Renz, Perennial Cropping Systems Extension Weed Specialist; Rodrigo Werle, Annual Cropping Systems Extension Weed Specialist; Nick Arneson, Weed Science Outreach Specialist; PJ Liesch Extension Entomology Diagnostician; and Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist. Topics will include updates in the area of weed, insect and disease management. A panel discussion and Q&A regarding the pest management challenges related to planting soybeans early will follow. 

The cost for the in-person events will be $50 per person and include a packet with materials including a hardcopy of A3646 Pest Management in Wisconsin Field Crops. This year ONLY, all in-person attendants will also receive a free copy of A Farmer’s Guide to Wheat Diseases, which is a $30 value. UW COVID safety protocols will be followed during the event. 

The cost for the virtual event will be $20 per person with pre-registration required. The virtual registration will include links to PDFs of materials and a PDF version of the A3646 publication. 

Below and in the attached flier are the dates, locations, and times for each event. Be sure to contact and register ONLY at the location you plan to attend. For the virtual option, links will be sent closer to the event.

 SOUTHERN WI 

Tuesday November 16 

1pm-4pm 

Ames Road Multi-Purpose Building 11974 Ames Rd, Darlington, WI 53530 

Josh Kamps, UW-Madison, Division of Extension 

Dan Smith, UW-Madison NPM Program 

Register with Sara Schilling 

608-776-4820 or 

sara.schilling@wisc.edu 

NORTHWEST WI 

Wednesday November 17

1pm-4pm 

Avalon Hotel and Conference Center 

1009 W Park Ave. 

Chippewa Falls, WI 54729 

Jerry Clark, UW-Madison, Division of Extension Kolby Grint, UW-Madison NPM Program 

Register with Jerry Clark 

715-726-7955 or 

jerome.clark@wisc.edu 

NORTHEAST WI 

Thursday November 18 

1pm-4pm 

Liberty Hall Banquet/ Conference Center 

800 Eisenhower Dr, Kimberly, WI 54136 

Kevin Jarek, UW-Madison, Division of Extension Jamie Patton, UW-Madison NPM Program 

Register with Kevin Jarek 

kevin.jarek@wisc.edu or ina.montgomery@outagamie.org 

(920)-832-4763 

VIRTUAL 

Friday November 19

9am-noon 

Kimberly Schmidt, UW-Madison, Division of Extension Dan Marzu, UW-Madison NPM Program 

Register at https://patstore.wisc.edu/secure/browse_ cat.asp?category_id=39 

Wisconsin Winter Wheat Disease Update – May 28, 2021

Damon L. Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Figure 1. Fusarium head blight risk for susceptible winter wheat varieties for Wisconsin as of May 28, 2021.

Winter wheat in Southern and South-central Wisconsin is quickly approaching anthesis. By early next week the window of opportunity to apply fungicide for Fusarium head blight (FHB; scab) will be here. Currently the risk for FHB is variable and ranges from low to high depending on where you are in the state (Figure 1). Given the recent rain events and rising temperatures, I think the risk is there for FHB next week. This situation should be monitored closely and a timely fungicide application decision should be made. In my previous post, I talk about how to manage FHB.  There are essentially three options for products in Wisconsin for control of FHB. These include Prosaro, Caramba, and Miravis Ace. All also have efficacy against other foliar diseases too. Remember, your window of opportunity to spray for FHB ranges from the start of anthesis (flowering) to about 7 days after the start of anthesis.

Stripe rust still remains unidentified in the state. Confirmed reports of stripe rust are only as close as central Illinois (Figure 2). Continue to remain diligent in scouting for this disease. Remember that fungicides for control of FHB will also be efficacious for stripe rust. Thus, we should be able to “kill two birds with one stone” when spraying for FHB.

Figure 2. Confirmed stripe rust reports for the U.S. as of May 28, 2021.

Reports of powdery mildew continue to come in.  Remember that the FHB fungicide treatments will control this disease. So at this point, two applications of fungicide are not needed. A well-timed FHB-focused fungicide app should help slow powdery mildew.

Get out there and scout, scout, scout!

2020 Wisconsin Field Crops Pathology Fungicide Tests Summary Now Available

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Brian Mueller, Assistant Field Researcher, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Each year the Wisconsin Field Crops Pathology Program conducts a wide array of fungicide tests on alfalfa, corn, soybeans, and wheat. These tests help inform researchers, practitioners, and farmers about the efficacy of certain fungicide products on specific diseases. This year we were a bit delayed in publishing the report, due to the challenges of COVID-19. However, we do appreciate your patience and hope you find the report useful in making decisions for the 2021 field season.

The 2020 Wisconsin Field Crops Fungicide Test Summary is available by clicking here. These tests are by no means an exhaustive evaluation of all products available, but can be used to understand the general performance of a particular fungicide in a particular environment. Keep in mind that the best data to make an informed decision, come from multiple years and environments. To find fungicide performance data from Wisconsin in other years, visit the Wisconsin Fungicide Test Summaries page. You can also consult publication A3646 – Pest Management in Wisconsin Field Crops to find information on products labeled for specific crops and efficacy ratings for particular products. Additional efficacy ratings for some fungicide products for corn foliar fungicidessoybean foliar and seed-applied fungicides, and wheat foliar fungicides can be found on the Crop Protection Network website.

Mention of specific products in these publications are for your convenience and do not represent an endorsement or criticism. Remember that this is by no means a complete test of all products available.  You are responsible for using pesticides according to the manufacturers current label. Some products listed in the reports referenced above may not actually have an approved Wisconsin pesticide label. Be sure to check with your local extension office or agricultural chemical supplier to be sure the product you would like to use has an approved label.  Follow all label instructions when using any pesticide. Remember the label is the law!

Fungicide For Field Crops Information Page Updated

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

The Fungicide for Field Crops Information webpage on the Badger CropDoc website has now been updated! The update includes links to the latest fungicide efficacy tables from the Crop Protection Network as well as several updated fact sheets from UW Integrated Pest and Crop Management Program. Many fungicide application decisions will be made over the next month or so. Even if you are already familiar with fungicides and how they work, a little refresher might be helpful as you make product and application decisions. If you aren’t familiar with fungicides or how to use on field crops, this page covers the basics with lots of useful information.

Wisconsin Winter Wheat Disease Update – June 23, 2020

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Brian Mueller, Assistant Field Researcher, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Figure 1. Septoria leaf blotch on a wheat leaf.

We are now well past the time to apply fungicide on winter wheat in Wisconsin. Anthesis has come and gone and now it is time to scout for the predominant diseases to start planning for harvest. We have not observed any symptoms of Fusarium head blight (FHB or scab) yet, but we will continue traveling and scouting.

We are beginning to observe increasing levels of foliar diseases on winter wheat in the state. Septoria leaf blotch (Fig. 1) is visible in the lower canopy and moving up the canopy in many fields we have been in, as weather remains wet and humid. Fungicide applications for FHB should slow the progress of Septoria leaf blotch up the canopy, but care should be taken to monitor the progress of this disease.

Figure 2. Barley yellow dwarf on winter wheat in Wisconsin. Note the purpled flag leaves.

We are also finding higher than normal levels of Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) in winter wheat (Fig. 2). Levels of BYDV are between 5 and 10% incidence on some varieties in the uniform variety trials. Higher levels may be a result of earlier than normal aphid flights this spring due to mild conditions. Regardless, I don’t think there is a huge amount of concern, as many varieties are resistant and levels observed are still below that at which yield might be reduced.

Finally, we have observed Cephalosporium stripe on wheat at the Arlington uniform variety trial location (Fig. 3). We have seen this disease occurring more frequently in the state over the last couple of seasons. One reason might be shorter rotations between wheat in some fields and potentially increased susceptibility in some varieties. I would say that this season it isn’t severe as far as we have seen, but we will rate the disease and report results if they look meaningful. You will remember that in 2019, we had a severe epidemic of Cephalosporium stripe at our Sharon, WI uniform variety trial location. The severity ratings can be found in the trial report.

Figure 3. Cephalosporium stripe of winter wheat in Wisconsin.

We continue to look for stripe rust in the state. While we have found it at VERY low levels in a couple of locations, we have not seen increased occurrence or severity since the initial observations. Hot and dry weather has kept this disease under control. We will continue to scout wheat in the state and report the results of our observations here. Until then, get out and SCOUT, SCOUT, SCOUT!

Wisconsin Winter Wheat Disease Update – June 2, 2020

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Brian Mueller, Assistant Field Researcher, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Figure 1. Fusarium Risk Tool prediction for FHB-susceptible varieties of winter wheat in Wisconsin on June 2, 2020.

Winter wheat in Wisconsin is moving through growth stages very rapidly over the past week due to ample moisture and heat. I have visited several fields this week with heads emerging or almost completely emerged. Anthesis (flowering) will begin in many winter wheat fields this week, if it hasn’t already started.

With the start of anthesis comes the critical time to consider a fungicide application for Fusarium head blight (FHB or scab). The Fusarium Risk Tool is showing very favorable conditions for the major wheat producing areas of Wisconsin, for susceptible varieties (Fig. 1). Risk is also medium-to-high in these zones for moderately susceptible varieties. Given the heat and high humidity with the multiple chances of rain predicted, a fungicide application may be warranted at this time in your winter wheat fields, especially if you have susceptible varieties.

Remember that the best time to apply a fungicide for FHB control is at the start of anthesis, up to 7 days after the start of anthesis. In Wisconsin, our research has demonstrated that we can significantly reduce the levels of deoxynivalenol (DON or vomitoxin) in finished grain if we wait until 5 days after the start of anthesis to apply our FHB fungicide. This is due to the fact that we often have uneven head emergence in our fields and delaying applications a few days after the start of anthesis can let these heads (or those on secondary tillers) “catch up.”

Fungicides considered most consistent in efficacy in University research include Prosaro®, Caramba®, and Miravis Ace®. Efficacy ratings for these and other products can be found on the Crop Protection Network’s Fungicide Efficacy for Control of Wheat Diseases fact sheet. Results from fungicide efficacy trials from the Badger Crop Docs, can be found BY CLICKING HERE. Research trials from 2019 that include the newest fungicide, Miravis Ace®, can be found BY CLICKING HERE and scrolling down to the last several pages. Remember, that the goal is to reduce damage by FHB and reduce DON levels as far below 2ppm as possible. The ideal method to do this includes an integrated approach of using resistant varieties and well-timed fungicide applications.

Figure 2. Stripe rust occurrence for a portion of the U.S. as of June 2, 2020

In our travels over the past week we also found stripe rust at very low levels in the Wisconsin Winter Wheat Variety trial located in Chilton, WI (Calumet Co.). We have documented this on the stripe rust monitor (Fig. 2). This was at low severity on flag leaves of known susceptible and moderately susceptible varieties of winter wheat. We have not observed stripe rust in the other variety trials in the state, or in other fields we have visited at this point. I believe that the high heat will keep stripe rust moving slowly. In addition, fungicide applications that will be applied for FHB control will also be effective in reducing the severity of stripe rust.

Now is the time to get out and SCOUT, SCOUT, SCOUT and make those educated fungicide spraying decisions!

Wisconsin Winter Wheat Disease Update – May 27, 2020

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Brian Mueller, Assistant Field Researcher, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Figure 1. Fusarium Risk Tool prediction for FHB-susceptible varieties of winter wheat in Wisconsin on May 27, 2020.

Winter wheat in Wisconsin has responded to above average temperatures and rainfall, rapidly advancing through growth stages. In just a week or so, mainstems have rapidly elongated. In some varieties in southern and south-central Wisconsin, flag leaves are fully out. While now is a good time to consider a fungicide application, foliar disease has been non-existent in fields we have been in. We are monitoring the stripe rust situation carefully, and while it is active in states to our south, we have not observed any in fields we have scouted. The above average heat will also keep stripe rust moving slowly, especially in varieties with moderate resistance. So for now, I think we can hold off on fungicide. With margins being tight, I think it is wise to keep our fungicide application for Fusarium head blight (FHB or scab). Fungicides directed toward FHB are also effective against stripe rust, should it move in later in the season. Continue to scout fields between now and head emergence to catch any foliar diseases that might emerge.

Speaking of FHB, conditions have been VERY conducive for this disease in Wisconsin over the past week. The Fusarium Risk Tool is showing very favorable conditions for the entire state of Wisconsin for susceptible varieties (Fig. 1) and favorable conditions in the southern portion of the state for even moderately resistant varieties. This situation needs to be monitored over the next few days as heads start to emerge and anthesis (flowering) begins. Humid/wet and warm conditions will keep risk of FHB high as anthesis begins. We have also had several years of significant FHB and Gibberella ear rot in corn, meaning we have ample inoculum sources locally to initiate FHB epidemics. Farmers with winter wheat should be prepared to make a fungicide application if these conditions persist, especially those with wheat varieties rated as susceptible to FHB.

Remember that the best time to apply a fungicide for FHB control is at the start of anthesis, up to 7 days after the start of anthesis. In Wisconsin, our research has demonstrated that we can significantly reduce the levels of deoxynivalenol (DON or vomitoxin) in finished grain if we wait until 5 days after the start of anthesis to apply our FHB fungicide. This is due to the fact that we often have uneven head emergence in our fields and delaying applications a few days after the start of anthesis can let these heads (or those on secondary tillers) “catch up.”

Fungicides considered most consistent in efficacy in University research include Prosaro®, Caramba®, and Miravis Ace®. Efficacy ratings for these and other products can be found on the Crop Protection Network’s Fungicide Efficacy for Control of Wheat Diseases fact sheet. Results from fungicide efficacy trials from the Badger Crop Docs, can be found by CLICKING HERE. Research trials from 2019 that include the newest fungicide, Miravis Ace®, can be found by CLICKING HERE and scrolling down to the last several pages. Remember, that the goal is to reduce damage by FHB and reduce DON levels as far below 2ppm as possible. The ideal method to do this includes an integrated approach of using resistant varieties and well-timed fungicide applications. Continue to monitor the wheat disease situation closely and get out and Scout, Scout, Scout!

Timely Wheat Disease Management Video Series and Wheat Fungicide Information

Damon Smith, Extension Field Crops Pathologist, Department of Plant Pathology, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Roger Schmidt, Nutrient and Pest Management Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Winter wheat in Wisconsin is finally starting to move along in growth stages. Warmer weather is helping to increase tillering. As wheat begins to move through growth stages, diseases and disease management will begin to be of concern. To assist in making wheat disease management decisions in Wisconsin, we have developed a 3-video series on the subject. Each video talks about making fungicide application decisions at the critical growth stages in for management in Wisconsin. The video series can be found below:

For information about fungicides and fungicide efficacy for winter wheat diseases, you can check out the “Fungicide Efficacy for Control of Wheat Diseases” fact sheet on the Crop Protection Network Website. Fact sheet A3878 – Fungicide Resistance Management in Corn, Soybean, and Wheat in Wisconsin has also been updated and available by CLICKING HERE.

Local data from fungicide efficacy trials in Wisconsin are also available on the Wisconsin Fungicide Test Summary Page. These trials date back to 2013 with the latest data from 2019. Be sure to scroll all the way through the documents as the wheat trials generally are listed toward the end of the documents.

Finally, don’t forget to get out and Scout, Scout, Scout to best make your in-season wheat disease management decisions!